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Dive Brief:

  • Shiok Meats, a Singapore cell-based shrimp company, closed a $12.6 million funding round this week. The money will go toward construction of a pilot plant to make the shrimp, which the company said is expected to launch in 2022.
  • The investment was led by Aqua-Spark, an investment fund focused on sustainable aquaculture. This is Aqua-Spark’s first investment in the cell-based industry.
  • While Shiok is the only cell-based meat company in Singapore, it is one of many working to complete a pilot plant to produce a larger amount of meat and to try to prepare for regulatory approval and an eventual commercial launch. Last week, Netherlands-based Mosa Meat closed a $55 million funding round to extend its pilot plant.

Dive Insight:

As 2020 looks to be a big year of funding for cell-based meat companies worldwide, it’s not surprising that Shiok Meats received an investment of its own. This latest round more than doubles the total amount that Shiok has raised since its founding in 2018 to $20.8 million.

Shiok, which means “delicious” in Singapore and Malay slang, is starting with cell-based shrimp, but it also is working to produce cell-based versions of lobster and crab. According to the company, they isolate stem cells from the crustaceans and grow them into meat under nutrient-rich conditions. In four to six weeks, they have seafood that is the same as what comes from animals in oceans or farms. The company said this technology can grow crustaceans four times faster than conventional production.

In the press release, Shiok said it plans to first produce frozen cell-based shrimp meat for dumplings and other dishes. In the future, the company said it will make shrimp flavoring paste and powder, fully formed 3D shrimp, and cell-based lobster and crab products. The company has said its target markets are the Asia-Pacific region and the U.S.

Since Shiok first came on the scene with a public taste test of cell-based shrimp dumplings last April, the company has been working hard to improve both its technology and product. Weeks after the taste test, it raised $4.6 million in a seed funding round. In June, the company had a second funding round, which pulled in $3 million. Company officials told Yahoo they planned to use those funds to start their plant.

In January, CEO Sandhya Sriram told Reuters it cost $5,000 to make a kilogram of shrimp — meaning a single dumpling could cost $300. She told the news service the company’s goal would be to cut that cost down to $50 per kilogram through new arrangements. In July, Vegconomist reported the details of those arrangements: Shiok had signed a deal to use new technology from Japanese cell-based meat company IntegriCulture.

It’s unclear what impact the coronavirus pandemic has had on Shiok Meats’ R&D and plant construction work, if any. What is known is that despite shutdowns across the globe, investors have been generous to cell-based meat startups.

According to a report from the Good Food Institute, the first quarter of 2020 brought cell-based meat companies a total of $189 million in funding — more than double the $77 million that was invested in them in all of 2019. It also was more than had been invested in the segment in its history.​ In addition to the funds Mosa Meat announced last week, Memphis MeatsBlueNalu and New Age Meats also have banked large funding rounds this year.

With a plant on the way and technology that could quickly make products that cost less, Shiok Meats seems like it could be on its way to getting products on the market in the next couple of years. It’s one of many cell-based companies that is at this point in development. Memphis Meats and Blue Nalu are using their fundraising to get into plants and start producing products.

Blue Nalu President CEO Lou Cooperhouse said in February the company was on track to produce cell-based mahi mahi for a test market in 2021. Memphis Meats Vice President of Operations Steve Myrick said in January the company was hoping to produce products by 2022. Eat Just, which is working on cell-based meat in addition to plant-based eggs, has said it could sell cell-based chicken nuggets in a very limited capacity as soon as it receives regulatory approval. And Israel’s Future Meat Technologies said last year it was on track to have a product for sale in its home country by 2021.

The final piece of the puzzle may be getting regulatory approval to sell these items because they represent a completely different way to produce meat. Company leaders across the cell-based sector have said they are working with government regulators in the United States, Europe, Asia, Israel and Russia. As the issue has proven to be contentious and scientific developments have continued, it would be interesting if a lack of approval is what ultimately slows development of this industry.

Sandhya Creates Delicious Cell-based Meat & Seafood For A Healthier Planet

What’s your story?
I am an entrepreneur, leader, scientist, wife, and mother. I am a stem cell scientist by education and training. Over the years, the entrepreneurship bug bit me, and ever since, I have been a creator. I was born in India, brought up in the Middle East, went back to India for my high school, undergrad and postgrad education, then moved to Singapore in 2009 to do a PhD. I have since made this beautiful city country my home.

From being a scientist in stem cells for healthcare to an entrepreneur in stem cells for food has been an amazing journey. Currently, I am the CEO and co-founder of Shiok Meats, Singapore and SE Asia’s first and only cell-based meat and seafood company.

“From being a scientist in stem cells for healthcare to an entrepreneur in stem cells for food has been an amazing journey.”

What excites you most about your industry?
I have been obsessed with the cell-based meat industry for the past 5 years, ever since it was introduced to the world. The whole industry is exciting because it is sustainable, clean, ethical, with zero animal cruelty, as well as delicious. I believe that serving delicious, healthy seafood and meats without the need to kill animals is the perfect way to eat!

What’s your connection to Asia?
I am originally from India, was brought up in the Middle East, and have based my home in Singapore for the past 11 years. Asia is in my blood. I have travelled across various continents at large, but I feel most at home in Asia. The food, the people, and the culture keeps me excited to live here.

Favourite city in Asia for business and why?
Currently, I choose Singapore. It is a great base for a startup and a perfect testing hub for APAC. The government is extremely supportive of the alternative protein and novel food industry in which sector my company, Shiok Meats, resides.

What’s the best piece of advice you ever received?
1. Networking: When you meet someone, make sure you get 3 contacts/connections from them. And when someone reaches out to meet you, give them 3 leads as well. That is how you build your network

2. Entrepreneurship: If you do not try, you will never know. So try it once, at least.

3. Funding: Raise money continuously, and as much money as you can. Never raise money only when your funds dry up.

Who inspires you?
Ryan Bethencourt, CEO of Wild Earth, is my biggest inspiration. I also get inspiration from people I meet in my life on a daily basis – be it a friend, a colleague, an employee, a peer, an investor, an advisor, a mom, a dad, a child, etc.

What have you just learnt recently that blew you away?
That the entire COVID situation has changed everyone’s life so much that we have had to rethink all of our choices, our way of life, the way we educate/learn, and the way we eat. I believe we humans have made the best out of an unfortunate situation!

If you had your time again, what would you do differently?
I would probably not do anything differently as I love the way my life and career are panning out, and can’t wait to see how it goes as the days unfold.

How do you unwind?
I binge watch a lot of TV shows, spend time with my son and husband exploring places, and eating vegetarian food. I used to travel a lot for work and leisure, though I have not done that for the past 6 months due to COVID. I am also very passionate about fashion, sustainable fashion in particular, so I enjoy blogging and tweeting about it on Instagram.

Favourite Asian destination for relaxation? Why?
Thailand for sure, for the beaches, the food, the massages and the friendly people!

Everyone in business should read this book:
“Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup,” by John Carreyrou.
This book tells you how “not” to run a business.

Shameless plug for your business:
Take an extra 60 seconds to think before you put food into your mouth. Think about where the food comes from, how it was made, and who made it. Make conscious choices. Each and every one of you can make a difference, and we are counting on you – let’s get the world to eat clean!

Shiok Meats is reinventing seafood by producing high quality and nutritious food from stem cells instead of animals — the seafood that we produce are healthy, animal friendly, and don’t harm the environment.

How can people connect with you?

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandhyasriram/

Twitter handle?

@sriramt_sandhya

Cell-based seafood producer Shiok Meats of Singapore has received US$12.6 million (S$17.3 million) in Series A funding – the latest alternative protein company to raise money as the pandemic pressures global food supply chains.

The new round of funding will sustain the start-up for at least three years and help finance research, development and its first plant in Singapore, according to chief executive and co-founder Sandhya Sriram.

New shareholders include Seeds Capital – the investment arm of Enterprise Singapore – and several venture capital funds. Temasek-backed fund Big Idea Ventures, which was a seed investor, did not take part in the latest round.

Start-ups and food giants around the world are racing to invent and improve alternatives to traditional meat production as consumers become more careful about nutrition and the environment.

While fake-meat companies such as Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat are raising the lion’s share of funding as they expand into new markets, other start-ups are working on lab-grown alternatives for a potential pool of customers that want to eat real meat and seafood that does not come from living animals.

Shiok Meats has raised US$20.2 million in total funding, and a person familiar with the fund raising said its post-money valuation is about US$50 million.

It takes the stem cells from shrimp before multiplying them in a “culture media”, a solution filled with nutrients. It is an expensive product used to make things like vaccines and is primarily sold by pharmaceutical and chemical companies. It is also a key reason why Shiok’s prawn meat now costs US$3,500 per kilogram.

The start-up is researching alternative and cheaper plant-based ingredients with the goal of bringing the cost down to US$50 per kilogram in 2022, when its products will be sold to businesses like restaurants.

Challenges remain: Without finalising the recipe, it cannot lock down the exact ingredient suppliers. And the process of acquiring bioreactors, the vessels in which the shrimp meat will grow, will take a year.

“We can see so many new players coming up,” Dr Sriram said of the cell-based meat sector. “The next five years will be about who survives, who makes the cut and who is able to support companies like ours make that step over to large-scale manufacturing.”

BLOOMBERG

Shiok Meats, a leading cell-based crustacean meat company based in Singapore, has secured US$12.6 million in Series A funding round, led by Aqua-Spark, an investment fund focused on sustainable aquaculture.

The round also saw participation a slew of investors from across the world, including SEEDS Capital (the investment arm of Enterprise Singapore), Real Tech Fund (Japan), Irongrey (a global tech investing family office based in Korea), Yellowdog Empowers Fund (South Korea).

Other co-investors in the round are Ilshin Holdings (Singapore), Toyo Seikan Group Holdings (Japan), Veg Invest Trust (US), Makana Ventures (Singapore), AiiM Partners LP (US), Beyond Impact (Europe), Kelvin Chan Siang Lin (Singapore), and Alex Payne and Nicole Brodeur (US).

According to a press release, Shiok will use the funds to build the first-of-its-kind commercial pilot plant from which it plans to launch its minced shrimp product in 2022.

In July, Shiok raised US$3 million in bridge funding from investors, including Agronomics and VegInvest.

Founded in August 2018 by two stem cell scientists Dr. Sandhya Sriram (CEO) and Dr. Ka Yi Ling (CTO), Shiok claims to be the first cell-based meat company in Southeast Asia and the first and only cell-based meat company working on shrimp.

It is working to bring cell-based crustacean meats (shrimp, crab, lobster) to the kitchen. Its meats are cruelty-free, healthy, and better for the environment with the same taste and texture and more nutrients than their traditional counterparts.

The startup stands out from other cell-based meat production companies because of its proprietary technology that isolates stem cells from shrimp, lobster, and crab. Once the stem cells are harvested, the shrimp, lobster and crab meats are grown in nutrient-rich conditions, similar to that of a greenhouse.

After four-to-six weeks, the cell-based seafood is exactly the same as its conventional counterpart but more sustainable, clean, and nutritious.

The output of Shiok’s pilot plant will be frozen cell-based shrimp meat for dumplings and other shrimp-based dishes. Beyond cell-based shrimp, Shiok plans to launch shrimp flavouring paste and powder, fully-formed 3D shrimp, and cell-based lobster and crab products in the coming years.

Mike Velings and Amy Novogratz, Co-founders of Aqua-Spark, said: “The cell-based animal protein industry has been on our radar for some time as once it is at scale it will have an enormous influence on food production efficiency, food safety, and the environment. As our first investment in cell-based seafood, Shiok Meats immediately stood out to us with their strong, female-led team and impressive milestones to-date.”

Shiok Meats’s shrimp dumplings

The shrimp market is a US$50-billion market globally with Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, and India being the major producers. While there are many farms and technologies improving shrimp farming, there is still a lot work to be done. Most of what is currently on the market is raised in crowded factories/farms and treated with antibiotics, chemicals, and hormones.

Conventional production processes often contribute to overfishing, excessive bycatch, misrepresentation, and mislabeling as well as contamination with effluents, heavy metals, and microplastics. This form of production is unsustainable and the sector strain will only increase as the population grows.

Shiok is addressing this need and disrupting crustacean production to ensure people can eat clean shrimp, crab, and lobster from a safe source.

Clean meat production could reduce the industry’s greenhouse gas emissions by 96 per cent, energy consumption by 45 per cent, land use by 99 per cent, and water consumption by 96 per cent.

Image Credit: Shiok Meats

Southeast Asia’s first cell-based meat company Shiok Meats announced that it raised USD 12.6 million in its Series A round led by Aqua-Spark, an investment fund focusing on sustainable aquaculture. Other investors include Singapore-based SEEDS Capital, Japanese Real Tech Fund, and the Korean Yellowdog Empowers Fund.

Currently still in R&D phase, Shiok Meats aims to go to market in “a few years,” according to its website. The firm will use the fresh capital to build a commercial pilot plant, which it plans to use for the launch of a minced shrimp product in 2022.

“The cell-based animal protein industry has been on our radar for some time, as once it is at scale, it will have an enormous influence on food production efficiency, food safety, and the environment,” said Mike Velings and Amy Novogratz, co-founders of Aqua-Spark.

For them, the current shrimp production methods are unsustainable, and clean meat production will help reduce strain on the industry by lowering greenhouse gas emissions, water and energy consumption, as well as land use.

“With [Aqua-Spark’s] help, we hope to become the global leader in cell-based crustaceans and seafood,” said Dr. Sandhya Sriram and Dr. Ka Yi Ling, CEO and CTO of Shiok Meats respectively.

Founded in Singapore in 2018 by Dr. Sriram and Dr. Ling, two stem cell scientists, Shiok Meats aims to produce clean and healthy seafood. It is currently working on producing cell-based crustacean meats, such as shrimp, crab, and lobster. Shiok Meats intends to eventually expand into Hong Kong, India, and Australia in the future, Dr. Sriram told KrASIA in a previous interviewIn June, the company raised USD 3 million in bridge funding.

AFBR recently interviewed Andrew D Ive, Founder of Big Idea Ventures to identify the latest investments within the plant-based category and how does COVID-19 impact on this segment.
The following are excerpts of the interview with him:

Could you tell us briefly what are the 3 upcoming new ventures in the plant-based arena ?
There are 3 interesting new ventures and they include development of plant-based egg using indigenous plants that are found in India. Another investment is into bee-less honey but identical to bee-based honey, using microbial fermentation. The final development is in plant-based growth media that replaces fetal-bovine-serum (FBS) and an edible plant-based scaffold for cell cultured meat.

With the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, does this have any impact on the investment plan as well as future potential for the plant-based segment ?
COVID-19 has accelerated the worldwide demand for alternative proteins and plant-based foods both by consumers as well as by investors. With the increasing scarcity of resources like land, water and energy and the disruption to global food supply chain, it has become all the more crucial for countries to improve their independence and food security through innovation.
There are also several speculations that COVID-19 originated from animal sources. This has increased the awareness of adopting an alternative approach to create protein. The cell-based technology is a more sustainable, cleaner and most efficient production method to produce protein. The cells are cultivated in a clean and controlled environment, which significantly reduces the likelihood of cross contamination and zoonotic disease.
During the pandemic, we notice faster growth in the plant-based market with greater consumer awareness. A wide variety of plant-based products is now already available in the market, which allows consumers to adopt a plant-based meal easily. There are several companies that establish innovative and state-of-the-art technology to recreate plant-based products that are nutritious and delicious. Big Idea Ventures is founded to support these companies and build a strong ecosystem of alternative protein.

What is the next step/strategy taken by Big Idea Ventures in view of the existing situation. Are there changes to existing plans ?
Big Idea Ventures will invest in and accelerate up to 100 plant-based and cell-based companies globally. We have 26 companies in our portfolio and we will invest in another 12 great companies in plant-based and cell-based technologies in our January 2021 accelerator program. There is a great opportunity for alternative proteins to address food security and environmental challenges and we will lead the way by finding the best, most innovative global companies in these categories.
Apparently, the pandemic does not slow down investments in this category, instead it has opened a great opportunity for alternative proteins to address food security and environmental sustainability issues.

One major area of consumer concern is on ‘price’ and ‘affordability’ of plant-based alternatives compared to the real thing (meat/product). How can this be addressed ?
If there’s a price difference at the moment, it’s just because of volume. As you manufacture anything in larger volumes, you improve your efficiency, and your ability to source large quantities of raw ingredients. When plant-based and cell-based meats have become less expensive than animal products, we will then see marked increase in consumption volume to match consumption of meat and other products that it substitute for.
Plant-based meat alternatives could be cheaper in the future as it is more efficient to make food directly from plants rather than breeding animals which involve costs like crop feed, land and other resources.

As plant-based meat gains traction, how do you also make that acceptable to the growing Halal consumer movement in this region ?
Some in the Islamic community may have concerns about whether consuming plant-based meat compromises Islamic belief. However, what Islam requires is that what you eat must be Halal and tayyub (Arabic for wholesome and pure). A plant-based diet fits both of these criterions.
Having a plant-based diet has also been proven to have health benefits, and to be of advantageous impact on the environment by reducing our land and water use, lowering pollution and our carbon footprint, and slowing down deforestations amongst other gains.
Plant-based meat however should be seen as an alternative and not a substitute for all meats, and consumers have the freedom to discern for themselves what they can and cannot consume.

Shiok Meats, the world’s first cell-based crustacean meat company, announces this hour that it has raised $12.6M in Series A funding, bringing the it closer in its mission to disrupt the seafood industry, according to an announcement sent to vegconomist from the Singapore based aquaculture pioneers.

Shiok Meats says it is the only cell-based meat company working on a cultivated shrimp product. Shrimp is a $50 billion global market with Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, and India as major producers exporting on a vast scale. The company’s fresh round brings its total raise to US$20.2 million.

The Series A was led by Aqua-Spark, the first investment fund focused on sustainable aquaculture. The funds will contribute towards building the first-of-its-kind commercial pilot plant from which Shiok plans to launch its minced shrimp product in 2022. This puts Shiok on schedule to become the first company in the world to have a fully functioning commercial pilot plant for cell-based crustacean production.

Shiok Meats Shrimp dumplings
Shrimp dumplings ©Shiok Meats

Co-founders Dr. Sandhya Sriram, CEO and Dr. Ka Yi Ling, CTO state today: “We are extremely excited to announce our Series A funding round which is taking us one step closer to commercialization. The investors coming in this round, from all over the world, are all aligned towards one mission – sustainable, healthy, and delicious seafood for everyone! The work that we are doing in partnership with our investors Aqua-Spark, SEEDS Capital, Real Tech, Irongrey, Yellowdog, Ilshin, Toyo Seikan, and other investors from our seed and bridge round is incredible!

“Our mission is to develop cell-based seafood and meats that are contributing towards a cleaner and healthier seafood industry and solving for the inefficiencies around global protein production. Aqua-Spark was the perfect partner to lead our Series A because they care deeply about funding companies that address planetary health and food security. With their help, we hope to become the global leader in cell-based crustaceans and seafood. We are pleased that Aqua-Spark supports our global impact vision and will be with us for the long haul.”

Shiok Meats Team
©Shiok Meats

Cell-based seafood producer Shiok Meats of Singapore has received $12.6 million in Series A funding — the latest alternative protein company to raise money as the pandemic pressures global food-supply chains.

The new round of funding will sustain the startup for at least three years and help finance research, development and its first plant in Singapore, according to Chief Executive Officer and co-Founder Sandhya Sriram. New shareholders include SEEDS Capital — the investment arm of Enterprise Singapore — and several venture capital funds. Temasek Holdings-backed fund Big Idea Ventures, which was a seed investor, didn’t take part in the latest round.

Startups and food giants around the world are racing to invent and improve alternatives to traditional meat production as consumers become more careful about nutrition and the environment. While fake-meat companies like Impossible Foods Inc. and Beyond Meat Inc. are raising the lion’s share of funding as they expand into new markets, other startups are working on lab-grown alternatives for a potential pool of customers that want to eat real meat and seafood that doesn’t come from living animals.

Shiok Meats has raised $20.2 million in total funding and a person familiar with the fundraising said its post-money valuation is about $50 million. It takes the stem cells from shrimp before multiplying them in a “culture media,” a solution filled with nutrients. It’s an expensive product used to make things like vaccines that’s primarily sold by pharmaceutical and chemical companies. It’s also a key reason why Shiok’s prawn meat now costs $3,500 per kilogram.

The startup is researching alternative and cheaper plant-based ingredients with the goal of bringing the cost down to $50 per kilogram in 2022, when their products will be sold to businesses like restaurants. Challenges remain: without finalizing the recipe, they can’t lock down the exact ingredient suppliers. And the process of acquiring bioreactors — the vessels in which the shrimp meat will grow, will take a year.

“We can see so many new players coming up,” Sriram said of the cell-based meat sector. “The next five years will about be who survives, who makes the cut and who is able to support companies like ours make that step over to large-scale manufacturing.”

Singapore-based cultivated shrimp startup Shiok Meats has just announced the closing of a US$12.6 million Series A funding round. The food tech says that the capital will go towards building the first commercial pilot plant to produce cell-based minced shrimp in 2022, taking the company yet another step forward to become the world’s first to bring cultivated crustacean to market.

Today, Shiok Meats revealed it has raised US$12.6 million in its Series A financing round led by Dutch sustainable aquaculture-focused investment fund Aqua-SparkOther investors participating in the round include Enterprise Singapore’s investment arm SEEDS Capital, the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry-backed Real Tech Fund, Seoul-based impact VC YellowdogVegInvestBeyond Impact and more. The latest capital injection follows the company’s US$3 million bridge funding round secured earlier in June this year and the seed round of US$4.6 million led by Henry Soesanto, CEO of Monde Nissin in May 2019– at the time the largest seed for an Asia-based cultivated food tech startup. This brings the startup’s total coffers to over US$20 million.

“We are really excited to be on the forefront of cell-based meats in SE Asia,” co-founder Dr. Sandhya Sriram told Green Queen. “We are looking forward to this industry pulling in a lot more investment and launching products in the near future.”

Shiok Meats says that the funds will go towards the construction of its first commercial pilot facility, where Shiok will launch its sustainable, traceable cultivated minced shrimp product in 2022. It will put the Singapore food tech on track to become the world’s first to launch a fully-functional commercial pilot plant dedicated to cell-based crustacean production.

Shiok Meats co-founders Dr. Ka Yi Ling (L) & Dr. Sandhya Sriram (R)

We are really excited to be on the forefront of cell-based meats in SE Asia. We are looking forward to this industry pulling in a lot more investment and launching products in the near future.

Dr. Sandhya Sriram, Co-Founder & CEO Shiok Meats

According to the startup, cell-based production of seafood could reduce the problematic aquaculture industry’s greenhouse gas emissions by 96%, energy consumption by 45% and water consumption by 96%.

“The cell-based animal protein industry has been on our radar for some time as once it is at scale it will have an enormous influence on food production efficiency, food safety, and the environment,” said Mike Velings and Amy Novogratz, co-founders of Aqua-Spark, in a press release.

“While we’ve invested in a number of technologies working to make shrimp farming more efficient, healthier, and less polluting, Shiok is the first company in our portfolio to focus on shrimp production. We are excited to help shape this novel and innovative industry, which we expect to have a huge impact on the future of seafood, while continuing to support sustainable aquaculture operations, inputs, and innovations across the value chain.”

“Aqua-Spark was the perfect partner to lead our Series A because they care deeply about funding companies that address planetary health and food security,” added Shiok Meats co-founders Dr. Sandhya Sriram and Dr. Ka Yi Ling. “With their help, we hope to become the global leader in cell-based crustaceans and seafood.”

Shiok is the first company in our portfolio to focus on shrimp production. We are excited to help shape this novel and innovative industry, which we expect to have a huge impact on the future of seafood.

Mike Velings & Amy Novogratz, Co-Founders of Aqua-Spark

Since its inception in 2018, the company has already successfully cultivated a shrimp product that has been sampled in the highly popular Asian dish shrimp dumplings or siu mai last year. Shiok Meats’ technology has recently won them a spot on Fast Company’s top 10 most innovative companies in the Asia-Pacific region.

Looking ahead, Shiok Meats will not only be producing cell-based shrimp meat, but are also eyeing more products, including cell-based shrimp flavouring paste and powder, a fully-formed 3D structured shrimp product, as well as cell-based lobster and crab in the coming years.

Lorem ipsum | Vietnam | cesiscompany.vn

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