Post Headline Formula: Podcast #12: Meat The End Founder and CEO, Yishai Mishor speaks with Andrew D. Ive from Big Idea Ventures about starting a company that has produced innovations in extrusion processing that make plant based products that mimic the texture of animal protein.

Podcasts

YouTube Episode


Meat The End

Their unique production techniques build a texture that really feels like meat.

www.meattheend,tech

 

Big Idea Ventures

Our mission is to solve the world’s greatest challenges by backing the world’s best entrepreneurs

 

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/bigideaventures/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bigideaventures_/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigideaventures

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigIdeaVentures/

 

Big Idea Food Podcast Host

Andrew D. Ive, Big Idea Ventures Founder

Andrew is the founder of Big Idea Ventures. BIV’s purpose is to solve the world’s greatest challenges by supporting the world’s best entrepreneurs. Our first fund + accelerator (NY, Singapore, and Paris) invests in plant-based foods and ingredients to impact climate change, animal welfare, and personal health. Investors include Tyson Foods & Temasek. Our second fund is focused on reducing CO2, plastics, waste, and water in the food industry. Friedman School Entrepreneurship Advisor. Harvard Business School graduate, Procter & Gamble brand management trained. 

 

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewive/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/andrewive/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/thefundingguru


Transcript

 

SUMMARY KEYWORDS

texture, technology, meat, company, producers, questions, plant based, burger, product, startup, people, real, business, tvp, sell, extruder, big, industry, potential clients, terms

SPEAKERS

Yishai Mishor, Andrew D Ive

 

Andrew D Ive  

Welcome to the big idea food podcast. I’m Andrew D, Ive your host from Big Idea Ventures. Today we’re going to be talking to Yishai, the CEO and co founder of Meat The End. These guys are focused on a new technology that will make meat, plant based meat in particular, have the right texture, so that people who are tasting, biting chewing this plant based meat won’t tell the difference between plant based and regular meat. It’s a tough challenge. I think these guys are up to it. Let’s have a conversation with Yishai and find out more about Meat The End. Welcome to the big idea food podcast. How are you sir?

 

Yishai Mishor  

I’m very good. Thanks for having me Andrew.

 

Andrew D Ive  

So Meat The End. Great company. We love you guys. We were just talking about that. Tell us all about what you’re up to, and why you’re a big idea.

 

Yishai Mishor  

I was thinking before coming here, where should I go with these questions? Should I tell Andrew about the beginning or about the future.

 

Andrew D Ive  

We have 45 minutes, so we can start at the beginning and go through to the future.

 

Yishai Mishor  

The three liner I always tell people when they ask me what we do, is to tell them we are in the food tech business, developing production techniques in order to improve the texture of plant based meat alternatives.

 

Andrew D Ive  

So why does plant based meat alternatives need to improve their texture? 

 

Yishai Mishor  

Have you eaten plant based burgers?  I have many, many, many times  They have a really good, and some of the famous companies have achieved really incredible results in terms of taste, but when it comes to texture, to what you feel in your mouth when you chew, it’s really mediocre and I think that description is right for virtually every product on the market.

 

Andrew D Ive  

And do you think that texture is the missing piece of the puzzle so that this kind of plant based meat experience is complete?

 

Yishai Mishor  

There are tons of studies, blind taste testing and so on, to support that this is the roadblock for consumer satisfaction, and when I say consumer, I mean those who are meat eaters who are considering switching, so basically potential flexitarians. These guys are the best, the most interesting and the biggest segment that we’re looking at and, for them, texture is a major problem. I think I told you yesterday about a study, where they ask people is this fake meat or real meat. They do it with chicken with beef with pork and 100% of the tasters can tell 100% of the times whether it’s real meat or alternative and the reason is mostly about the texture.

 

Andrew D Ive  

So they’re so they’re taking a bite of this plant based whatever it is, and it may taste pretty darn close to the original. It may smell after it’s cooked, very similar to the original. But the one giveaway is texture.

 

Yishai Mishor  

It’s definitely a bottleneck for the industry. And the reason I’m saying this was so much, you know, confidence is because the entire industry is using the same technology to get the texture. So everyone’s using the same technology, everyone’s getting to more or less same level of same form of texture. And it’s it’s and it’s medium, it’s not very good for them.

 

Andrew D Ive  

So they’re all using the same machines and the same processes today to get to the texture they arrive at and it’s just not quite getting far enough to normal or to what is the usual experience with meat?

 

Yishai Mishor  

Absolutely. And I mean, who can blame them right? It’s a very complicated process to take plant protein, which has its own shape, form and body and turn it into something that resembles animal protein. This is not an obvious task at all. You said something about taste you know today you can buy fragrances and flavors that will basically give you the flavor of anything. You can have salmon without salmon and chicken without chicken and beef without beef. So the taste issue, still under development and there are companies that are doing really interesting stuff with it but I think where almost there.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Who are some of those companies that are doing interesting things on the tech side..

 

Yishai Mishor  

The most famous is of course Impossible Foods with their beam. Beam gives you a bloody irony feel to your taste and it also does something in the experience of cooking. Which is another important thing. If you use the Impossible Patty and put it on the grill, you will see how it turns from gray on the outside. I mean, it’s still red on the inside and gray on the outside, just like real meat. 

 

Andrew D Ive  

So the kind of distinction between Impossible and most other plant based burgers and meats out there, is that beam, that redness, that bloody kind of experience, that one thing that makes them more like the original meat product they’re replacing. Is this with Meat The End and your ability to get that texture right for the first time, is that the kind of impossible difference that your customers can ultimately have? Obviously, it’s not hean but it’s one step closer to the real deal.

 

Yishai Mishor  

Absolutely. And the goal we set for ourselves was not just to improve texture, but to improve texture in a way which is effective and that is easily adopted by the industry. So we’re looking for a solution that is cheap and that doesn’t require too much change in machinery, production lines, and so on. I think that that means that by the time we will become commercial in about a year from now, if you have a production line for tbp, which is basically the beginning of the road for plant based burger, you will be able to adopt our technology with our relatively low costs and short term and effectively improve texture performance.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Okay, so are there other companies trying to solve this particular problem? As far as the texture issue is concerned?

 

Yishai Mishor  

Can I please answer and then you’ll ask me another time? And then I’ll answer it again, because I have two different answers for this one. The first answer is that, sure. Think 3d printing. What 3d printing companies do is basically about actual even cultured meat. I mean, definitely the questions, the challenges they’re facing, many of them are around questions of body of texture and so on. There’s also a few more traditional technologies that are out there, such as fermentation and some enzymatic treatments, that they are doing so basically, there are some ideas out there. However, 3d printing and meat grown in labs these are the two most famous so you know, most science fiction technologies are science fiction. It’s going to take at least five years if not 10, before they become commercial and there’s a big issue around that.

 

Andrew D Ive  

I never really gravitated towards the 3d printing technology because, having been to a slaughterhouse, I’m sort of aware of the sheer volume of meat that is processed on an hourly, daily, weekly basis and for a 3d printer to get anything like that scale of production, so that it brings the price to a commercially viable, manageable level. I don’t see the technology getting there anytime soon. Now, I see there being sort of a novelty aspect of 3d printing where you can make a steak, you know, over a 20 minute period in a restaurant and wow people with the process, but yeah, I’m not seeing it. I don’t think it’s science fiction, but I don’t see it being commercially viable.  By the way Yishai, this is going to be on YouTube so you’re showing everyone your kitchen, which is awesome. I’m going to pause the video and see what you had in your kitchen cupboards at some point. So getting back to that question. You said your technology is going to be commercially available in a year. I’m guessing the next year is about hitting those metrics of not just, you know, can you get the texture right because I know having seen a lot of videos and seeing the product, that you can already get the texture right. This is more about making it available within the processes and making it available inexpensively, so that it’s commercially viable. I’m guessing that’s what the next 12 months is about? We call it optimization, some of the stuff you mentioned and a few other things. But yeah, we need to make sure that ours is a process that not just works but works on a large scale and can be easily adopted by large scale producers. Perfect. I’m guessing there are companies out there, not necessarily Impossible or Beyond, but there are companies out there who are looking to find the answer to this texture problem.  Are you anticipating over the next 12 months, working with any of them? whether it’s from a prototyping perspective, or from a trial perspective, to refine the optimization of your product?

 

Yishai Mishor  

We try to keep in touch. We are a very new company. We were just founded at the beginning of 2020 so only a year and a bit in the business. We’re trying to keep in touch with as many figures as we can from the large producers, you know, if not for bottom line agreements yet, but if not for that, then at least to be able to have one eye on the product and understanding what our potential clients think and what are their considerations.  So I know, there is some work being done in different giants of meat alternatives around that and it’s always like everything in innovation, some of it is really short term incremental change, something that can be achieved now or next year and some of it is far fetched, you know, revolutionary ideas, trying to be aware of the entire scope of innovation. I think that ours is a pretty solid idea that has the potential of doing some serious revolution in the business.

 

Andrew D Ive  

So if I’m a plant based meat producer, and I’m interested in your technology, because I think that getting the texture right or to help me increase my sales, my revenues, my share of market, or the traditional KPIs of building a great business. Is this an ingredient I buy from you that gets added to the product? Is this a piece of hardware that gets put in the production line to add an extra step in production to add that texture aspect? How are you and what is it you’re building? And how do I adopt it if I’m a large producer of plant based foods?

 

Yishai Mishor  

Our business model is called pure licensing. So we’re patenting our technology to be a bundle of patents that protects each product, and then selling licenses for producers to use. However, I’m telling you, frankly, we’re just you and me here in this conversation, we’re beginning to realize that we will have to have a step where we actually do it ourselves. So produce and sell our burgers, whether ourselves directly or through a third party, but having a period where we sell it to a specific market, could be Israel could be one of the European countries to prove to the world that what we do, actually, you know, sells and that it works. Then I’m sure that the ultimate dream of selling bases to huge producers will be much easier to achieve.

 

Andrew D Ive  

So I feel like I asked one question and, as is the kind of political background that you have, you answered a slightly different question. I was sort of getting to how, as a producer of plant based foods, do I adopt your technology?  If I’m a Beyond and I say this is technology we need, I think this is going to make our product just even more breakout than it already is because it’s going to finally have the right texture. I want this technology. I want to introduce it to my product tomorrow.  Is this something they put in the product which creates the texture, or is it part of the process of Production that adds that texture? You obviously have patents and things which protect you. So you don’t want to go into too much detail, but is it process or as ingredient?

 

Yishai Mishor  

I’m sorry not to give you a straight answer, but I’ll give you a straight explanation why I can’t do it. We are literally weeks away from submitting our first patent. Okay, as I told you, before we started the recording, we’re just finished the last round of experiments needed for the pattern. It’s happening this month and it’s the most delicate time of all times for a startup, based on high knowledge but it’s something that improves the process. It’s mostly about process.  There are many different ways for how a company can sell information or technique to other companies and there are different black boxes, you can sell parts of the machinery, you can sell the parts, or certain type of ingredients that are necessary. All these are mostly strategic questions that should be resolved with attention to the legal and the business side but we are now more preoccupied with the technology, we want to make sure that we have in our hands, a really good and effective technology to improve texture, all questions of fair business model and so on, how do we make sure that we’re not being copied? How do we make sure that we actually give advantage to our potential client? And those things will be answered in the right time? I think it’s a bit too soon.

 

Andrew D Ive  

And by the way, I love that you bring that up, and you sort of push back a little because this is a delicate time for you, which most entrepreneurs will go through. Okay, if we’ve got real IP here, how do we protect it? How do we make sure that we’re following the necessary steps to validate the business and get customers on board? but also how do we protect what we have and what is unique to our company? So I totally appreciate that. Let’s just back up a bit then, from a proof perspective that your technology actually delivers the kind of texture goals that you’ve set yourselves? How have you been able to prove it to yourself, and potentially prove it to your partners that you guys can do what you want to do as far as texture is concerned?

 

Yishai Mishor  

It’s a really great question and I was surprised that there was relatively little background in the literature to help us answer that question when we first approached them. What we do is we have a series of phrenological testing for our TVP and TVP we produce using our topology…..

 

Andrew D Ive  

What does TVP stand for? 

 

Yishai Mishor  

TVP is texturized vegetable protein. The building blocks of plant based burgers and other meat alternatives. Basically, we’re talking about a huge machine called an extruder. On one side, the input is a protein powder, for example. So 70% soy concentrate. It applies heat, pressure and shear force. On the other side, you got flakes a little bit like cornflakes. Cornflakes are made with the same technology, and that’s the texturized soy protein that goes on. This is the stuff that is the body of your burger or Patty.o that So we measured TVP with different neurological testing, there’s an instrument called the texture analyzer and different attachments that go to it and measuring that. I was surprised to see that leading companies in the world such as ADM, DuPont, Circle 40 that sell TVP, If you ask for a brochure with information about the TVP that they sell, they’ll give you stuff that includes nutrition facts and water holding capacity and so on, there is hardly any information about texture.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Despite the fact that texture is one of the key requirements for a great end product..

 

Yishai Mishor  

Exactly, and this is a tension that it’s really surprising, but then again, I’m saying okay, that means we’re onto something, because we know for a fact that it’s a major issue for the consumer and we know for a fact that it’s almost non existant in the discussion between backdoor companies that produce TVP and producers of a burger.

 

Andrew D Ive  

So let’s get back to it in terms of current plant based patties, let’s say that there’s a 100% measure which is the real texture, the real taste of a regular hamburger, beef, burger, whatever, burger where are you? Where do you think the current plant based versions are in terms of that full experience? From a texture perspective? Are they kind of getting to 70%? Are they getting to 60%? Are they getting to 80%? Is that it? Do you have any further? I mean, maybe this is your personal point of view, but the current plant based products, how close are they to the real thing? Maybe there’s a report, maybe there isn’t. But you know, what’s your, what’s your feel on this?

 

Yishai Mishor  

I think they’re really far away as they are pretty spongy. It’s got a almost gooey feeling when you chew it. There are many different ways to describe texture and when you have sensory panels, either professional or just lay people tasting and giving feedback, It’s a problem. I’m not sure it’s possible to give a number between zero and 100, but there are in general as there is analytical testing, where you get instruments that are checking physical or chemical properties of the material, and then sensory, which basically means people eating and giving you feedback, which is obviously more subjective.  So there’s human and sensory and there’s instrumental, a more analytical examination. Obviously, for instrumental, it’s much more because it’s subjective, and it’s numbers, it’s much easier to show where we stand and so on, I can tell you that we tested ours against the most leading products in the market, and we are slightly below twice in terms of firmness and several other characteristics of texture. So we’re doing really well in that sensory panel but it is less objective and a bit more complicated to analyze. But what we do, in order to get it there, is we have our fixed recipe for a burger which is like our model burger.

 

Andrew D Ive  

And then you pick a burger, which is probably the kind of market norm for a plant based burger and that’s the target or that’s the standard

 

Yishai Mishor  

We try our stuff against other people’s TVP …

 

Andrew D Ive  

Got it. So your, as far as the science is concerned, or the analytics is concerned, yours is twice as effective from a texture perspective as the kind of norm or the standard if there is such a thing.

 

Yishai Mishor  

It’s very easy to play with numbers and I don’t want to be one of those people saying, Yeah, you should see we have five times more than that and 10 times more than that. I understand that texture is a very complicated issue because at the end of the day, it’s a human experience. We absolutely have data that shows that we are twice I mean that we are double better than the eight competitors in terms of specific texture characteristics, right.  There are some improvements that need to be done. In the end. I want you to take a bite of this patty and not be able to tell whether it’s made of cow or made of soy pea protein or wheat or whatever, exactly indistinguishable from animal protein.

 

Andrew D Ive  

And that’s the goal. That’s the kind of Holy Grail as far as texture is concerned, someone not knowing the difference. Now, I’d love to, if we had a two hour slot of time, to kind of get into what is texture in the mouth and what are we really experiencing when we’re biting things but I’m guessing I’d lose half of the audience as well. All three people that are listening right now one and a half of those three people would give up and go do something else. So you believe that this is a 12 months, you’ve got about a 12 month cycle left in terms of having this product and or process available for customers to use, whether that’s Beyond Impossible or any of the others, it’s about a 12 month cycle.

 

Yishai Mishor  

When I speak to investors, I promised them by the end of quarter three for the next year, so about 12 to 15 months from now.

 

Andrew D Ive  

And you mentioned, one thing you’re going to do in between is manufacture some of your own products, where you know, your texture is far, far superior to what’s out there today, and actually launch those in a market to, to kind of prove it.

 

Yishai Mishor  

This will be the first commercial step. I mean, this is what we’re looking to do as our first app, once we get commercial, this is what we did, thinking of this as a go to market strategy.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Got it understood. When you’re talking about one businesmodel, which is about the kind of technology which allows the end producer to produce something far better for their consumers, which gives them, the consumers, the experience they’re waiting for from plant based. On the other, you’re going to, and this is, you know, I’m going to put it this way on purpose, you’re going to mess around with making your own Patty and trying to create a brand and a product and a price point that’s achievable.  To prove a point in the market, and I get proving the point piece, I try and prove points all the time. But in terms of totally different business models, different team members in terms of being able to do this well, unless you outsource everything. Is it not potentially a bit of a distraction instead of just going and having the conversations with the key producers, and show them what you have and figure out how to partner with them..

 

Yishai Mishor  

I think the way to prove is to actually sell pudding, rather than tell everybody how amazing your pudding is. 

 

Andrew D Ive  

There’s a few examples that I can think of where knowledge was sold in the food business, but not before some products were sold. So first, there was movement of products and only then movements of information, buying their licenses for it. I’m guessing that if we prove ourselves in a particular market, be it Israel or somewhere in Western Europe, and confined to this territory I think that this can do tremendous work for both us and our potential clients and show them that this thing actually has massive impact potential. You know, thinking about how consumers make their ultimate purchasing decision, it always comes down to the mouth experience, the taste, the texture, and very little to do with the education. So I think you might be right, maybe the answer to getting folks understanding that your texture is so much better than what’s out there today, is getting that product in their mouths and getting them to experience it for themselves.

 

Yishai Mishor  

Remember, I said for you to ask me the same question twice, the one about how many and who else is doing texture out there?

 

Andrew D Ive  

But we’ve only got nine minutes. Is that what you want to spend the next nine minutes on?

 

Yishai Mishor  

Yes because it’s such a good story. So we we are working with extruders as discussed in the beginning of the interview.

 

Andrew D Ive  

This, for people who aren’t up to speed on the technology, is technology in production.

 

Yishai Mishor  

Sorry I did not get that …..

 

Andrew D Ive  

There are people out there who will not know what extruders are …. 

 

Yishai Mishor  

An extruder is kind of a whale. It’s a huge thing. It’s a huge mammal. The technology was born in the polymer and plastic industry and penetrated into food industry in the 70s and became more and more popular in the 90s. It’s good for producers because it has a very large productivity rate. So it can do tons, a day. 

 

Andrew D Ive  

It is an enormous machine. Really enormous.

 

Yishai Mishor  

The first time I saw this machine, we were working together with partners in Germany, comparing the producers affects on students. First time I saw it, I thought of like a Industrial Revolution, not food tech in the 21st century. It’s huge. It’s noisy, it’s messy, it’s got smoke, it’s very smelly. I loved it, it felt like real steam engines, like a monster and this thing is also pretty expensive and that’s the reason why, I don’t know of any startup in the world that is doing r&d around extrusion.  Of course, there are extruder producers. Huge companies like Bula, Oplex, style, and carry and they of course have their r&d innovation. But startups, a little company that starts with crazy ideas, like many startups, that you invest in and support in your business. I don’t know if anyone except us is doing it. The reason is that there’s a really high entry barrier. This machine costs several hundreds of 1000s of dollars just for this tiny lab scale.  So we are standing in front of a situation where most of the industries using this technology, and there’s hardly any innovative startup t activity around it. And that’s why I think there’s incredible potential in what we do, even if not focusing on the immediate, you know, plant based soy burger texture, which we just discussed until now I think more generally, the idea that there’s a startup that can gain knowledge and experience in working with extruder machines and have the brainpower to develop that thing is a huge potential for the industry and for us as well. And for you.

 

Andrew D Ive  

So I think you know, Bueller is an investor in our fund so we’ve got a an incredible relationship with those guys. We should just have you go live in Zurich and

 

Yishai Mishor  

All of them will love this idea. How’s Zurich doing with COVID by the way?

 

Andrew D Ive  

I don’t know. It’s funny, people are gonna listen to this podcast and watch this video in like five years time and they’ll be like, COVID Oh, yeah, that was that thing back in the day. And obviously, we’re all living it right now. So it’s top of mind. Couple of quick questions in the last five minutes that we have, if I can. In terms of Meat The End, starting a business is always challenging. I’m wondering if you’ve had any moments over the last, you know, 18 months since you started the company where life has thrown you a curveball, and you’ve had a challenge you’ve had to deal with that could have been quite dramatic for the company? Or is it all been perfect, and everything’s been wonderful.

 

Yishai Mishor  

I had one yesterday and two this morning then, over lunch, a couple more. Wow, man, this is really crazy and I know everybody says that, but until you’ve actually experienced it, you can’t imagine what it’s like. It’s like trying to build a car, where you have no car parts, but you need to somehow gather up parts and build a car while you drive it at 100 miles an hour downhill with no brakes. And you’re still building the car as you go.  This is what it feels like. It’s like, every time I’m thinking wow, I’ve done so much and this is taking so much of my time and everything is so dramatic. Then two months pass and it becomes even bigger and even more stressful and there’s ever changing landscape and always on the go. There’s surprises almost on a daily basis. I love it because it’s a perfect balance between planning and doing structured work and chaos.  This is something that really speaks to me personally and I think also for the rest of the team at BBN. We have a combination of about half of our team are very seasoned experienced over 60 you know, Chief a technologist and senior engineers from the biggest companies in the world, people that have seen their share of management and r&d and so on. And another half is young people that are either just out of their PhD or a developmentships and so on and this is not necessarily by age distinction, but we have in our company from the structured and ordered and from the chaos and I think that this is a blessing to work in this business where you can have some chaos and some order in your day, before lunchtime.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Now, if I think back to when I started my first company, I sort of had this misguided belief that there was some sort of God of entrepreneurialism that required sacrifice. It required me to give up all of my time to spend, you know, 60/80/100 hours a week. Thinking about the company, working on the company, giving up all sorts of things, time with friends, from a personal health perspective, time with family, because, you know, the God of entrepreneurialism required, his or her sacrifice. I only really realized after maybe the second or the third startup that, you know, I needed that break from the company that disconnect so that I could maintain a mental health and physical health, so that I could be better for the business and be fresher and be more useful and valuable. What’s that like for you? Have you figured out that you do need those disconnects? Or, given that you have family members around you coming in and asking you questions all the time, you don’t even have a choice in how you disconnect and when you disconnect? How do you deal with this?

 

Yishai Mishor  

It’s a bit personal, but I’ll tell you. I have an almost daily ceremony with myself. Before I go to bed, I take a shower, my thoughts start running, and I think about the day, think about tomorrow, and so on. And I daily have this moment where I’m saying to myself, even in the shower, like, let go and just have five minutes without obsessively thinking about something related to the startup.  But it’s, well, you don’t need me to tell you that you’re just like, you’re one of those people. I’m an obsessed person, I have tasks, and I get hooked on them and I can’t sleep and many of my colleagues in the startup are cut from the same block. And if it wasn’t media, and it was something else before that, I don’t see that as a big change in my life, to be worried about something continuously. The big change is doing something that is in the startup business and that has this dynamic. I do have a rule of one day off a week at the weekend when I’m not doing emails, no phone calls, no nothing. 

 

Andrew D Ive  

Yeah, my time frame and Sundays for me personally. I also created this mental box that I would decide on, on a daily basis, what time I was finishing work. And from that particular time, I would put all of their questions, concerns, thoughts, you know, things I still need to think about in the box, this mental box and say, okay, it’s 9pm or 10pm, or whatever the time is, it’s going in the mental box, locking it, and I’m not gonna think about it until tomorrow morning when I open the box up and start my day again. And I needed that, you know, two hours at the end of the day where I could think about other things I could focus on family daughter, dog, wife, not in that order. In case my wife’s listening …..

 

Yishai Mishor  

Is the dog listening

 

Andrew D Ive  

But no, there’s this mental box, you know, 8:30pm finish, I now need to think about the other more important things in my life, you know, health, wellness, mental health, wellness, family, etc. It doesn’t sound like you have that box yet. 

 

Yishai Mishor  

Can you send me one?

 

Andrew D Ive  

I,ll send you one. How’s that?

 

Yishai Mishor  

Yeah, it sounds like a great idea.  I like this approach.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Well, now you gave me until 10am my time, I’m not sure what that means in your time, but I know I’m two minutes over. So last question, Meat the End, where do people find you who want to? Whether it’s to ask you questions or to potentially become a customer or invest or you know, whatever it is, interview you, how do people find Yishai and Meat the End?

 

Yishai Mishor  

It’s not just Yishai, we have a very large team 12 people all of them would be really happy to tell you more about what we do and why we think it’s exciting and worth the effort. And you can look us up in our website, it’s meattheend.tech.  Happy to get in touch with anyone who feel this is something that they can contribute to.

 

Andrew D Ive  

What about LinkedIn? And I’m guessing as you’re a b2b company with a technology, maybe you’re not doing the Instagram thing, or certainly not the tick tock thing.

 

Yishai Mishor  

I meant for like for my personal name, and I’m on LinkedIn and no, but to get to the company just Just look us up. Just on our website.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Fantastic. So folks, meattheend.tech. If you want to talk to me Yishai Mishor. He’s also on LinkedIn as Yishai. Thank you for your time today. Sorry, we’ve gone a couple of minutes over. Please forgive me and we’ll pause the video now. 

 

Yishai Mishor  

Thank you, Andrew. Thanks. 

 

Andrew D Ive  

Thanks for coming along to the Big Idea Food podcast, with Yishai from Meat the End, I think it was great having his five year old niece getting involved in the podcast, I could have edited it out but you know, we’re all in a kind of lockdown period. Life is happening through virtual mediums, through podcasts through, you know, zoom calls, and so on and it was nice just to have a little child get involved just for a few minutes and participate.  Hopefully it wasn’t too distracting. But you know, this is the real world. We could have taken it to a studio and edited it out and all these wonderful things but, you know, why don’t we give you the real experience of the conversation we had today. So hope you enjoyed the conversation. Please do reach out to Yishai from meattheend.tech. If you have any questions or want to get involved in any way. If you want to reach out to me, I’m Andrew, I’ve been your host from Big Idea ventures. Please do like and subscribe and get involved. By all means listen to next week’s podcast and look forward to entertaining you then. Many thanks. Bye

Lorem ipsum | Vietnam | cesiscompany.vn

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