Podcast #7: Novel Farms CEO and Founder Nieves Martinez-Marshall speaks with Andrew D. Ive from Big Idea Ventures about starting a company that improves animal welfare, food safety and human wellbeing through development of the technologies necessary to advance cellular agriculture.

Big Idea Ventures is launching our very own podcast “The Big Idea Podcast: Food”. Each week Big Idea Ventures Founder Andrew D. Ive will speak with some of the most innovative minds in the food-space and talk about the exciting projects they are a part of. 

To listen to the 7th episode click the links below!

Podcasts

YouTube Episode


Transcript:

SUMMARY KEYWORDS

meat, cells, scaffolds, pigs, companies, technology, product, scaffolding, farms, people, agriculture, cellular, grow, pork, protein, consumer, produce, bioreactor, animal, cuts

SPEAKERS

Nieves, Andrew D Ive

 

Andrew D Ive  

Hi, this is Andrew from the big idea food podcast. Thanks for coming. Today we’re going to be talking to Nieves, the CEO, and co founder of Novel Farms. Novel Farms is working with cellular agriculture, to create some amazing pork products and scaffolding, some really interesting technology and some interesting discussions around this new way of producing protein. I look forward to the conversation and look forward to your comments. Thank you. Hey, Nieves, how are you?

 

Nieves  

I am good and you ….. nice to hear your voice.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Nice to speak to you too. So Novel Farms, just tell everyone all about Novel Farms and what you guys are doing and why it’s amazing.

 

Nieves  

Oh, yes. Gladly. So Novel Farms is a cell based meat company that focuses on producing whole cuts of meat, and in particular, of premium meat, which means the most exceptional animals there are out there. And our edge is that we’re able to make whole cuts, because we’ve developed a scaffolding technology that is scalable, affordable, and that is the missing piece in premium agriculture right now, such technology does not exist. So that’s why we’re going for whole cuts.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Alright, let’s let’s kind of break this down for people who aren’t up to speed on whole cuts and the different kinds of terminologies and things. Just explain to us a little bit about what you mean by whole cuts and premium meat and so on. So for the people that are not in the space.

 

Nieves  

Yes, so cellular agriculture is a new industry that’s emerging, in which we can produce meat by taking a biopsy of an animal and then growing the cells in a bioreactor in that way, there’s, you know, no slaughter needed and it increases environmental and health benefits for the world.  So, of course, we are all working in this industry to create this meat, that is going to be beneficial. The problem is that when you take cells and just grow them in liquid solution, and then you make ground meat it actually means meat because it’s only the muscle cells, you know, but however, when you think about a steak, when you are a big meat eater, who really likes to eat a pork tenderloin, or brisket or all those things, well cellular agriculture right now is not able to recreate or form a tissue from an animal, like, that’s a whole different story, right?  In our body, we have our muscles, there’s muscle, there’s fat and there’s also a thing called connective tissue. So connective tissue is a structural network of proteins that serves as the scaffold for these muscle cells and the fat cells to grow on. So, without that structure, what you have is unstructured meat, you can make meatballs you can make sausages, etc. but you cannot, without the scaffold, you cannot make a whole gut.  So now, you know in regenerative medicine people can make organoids for transplant, etc. So it’s possible to create tissue in that particular case, however, the scaffolds that are used there are extremely expensive, of course, they’re going to be that organ is going to be put in your body and you know, the purity needs to be you know, very high grade purity. So for cellular agriculture, we want to use the same scaffolds because we know they work?  Of course it’s not possible because you can not produce a commodity. McDonald’s burger with such scaffolds, right because they’re extremely expensive. So Novel Farms was born to solve that problem, to enable cellular agriculture for us and later on for other companies to be able to make whole cuts, and then really show the world that, you can eat ethically, you can eat clean meat that doesn’t have these hormones and all these nasty things that are the result of growing and slaughtering the animals in factory farming.  If we don’t give the consumer something that is really attractive, that is as good as a pork tender loin right now from the animal.  So we think in other forms that the barrier can be surpassed by giving customers a product that  they are not going to be able to say no to, and that’s the reason why we are going in particular, to produce good red meats. Premium meats, the ones that are really highly valuable, expensive, in limited amounts to kind of entice the future consumer, and really convince them, not just by saying, Oh, this is the same meat, but by saying, hey, you now are able to eat this, look seriously at me. And this is thanks to cellular agriculture.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Got it. So, meat as a category is varied. Obviously, there’s many, many different kinds of meat products that people consume. Cell based, is a way of taking the cells of a basic meat, whether it’s pork, or chicken, or beef and being able to replicate those cells to the point where you can create meat without needing to slaughter the animal without needing to have an animal grow in a farm yard or in a factory for months at a time, right?  The premise here is that because meat is such a varied range of products, cellular agriculture right now is only able to produce unstructured meat. So to your point, meatballs and ground beef and basic meat products. But consumers want variety, different cuts, different thicknesses from the traditional meat products and so although cell based meat can create that grounded beef, meatballs and those sorts of things, the cell based industry needs to evolve, so that it ultimately can deliver the full range of products that we have grown up with as a species, consuming over time? So your company is part of that evolution from the ground beef basic cell structure product, to the more complex products that consumers are used to consuming in the meat industry. Is that is that a good summary of what you guys are all about?

 

Nieves  

Yes, and I would add that it’s an emerging industry, so of course, you don’t start building a house from the roof, what you do is you  start with the critical problems that need to be solved. So most companies started with the fact that cell based meat is expensive because of the media needed to grow the cells. So let’s fix that problem first and then what’s the second problem … scaling?  So we can produce large quantities, but of course, focusing on scaffolding in the very beginning of this process is kind of counter productive because of course you must deal with the first problems first, right? So we are ahead of the game. We know that once those problems are solved, and we’re very close to getting you the price and variety right, then we will have this perfect structured meat product to jump right in.  So, we have to start now because structuring is scientifically a complex endeavor, connective tissue has a lot of different proteins, different functions and are a  integrated matrix basically. So, my co founder and I happen to be experts in protein chemistry, molecular biology, in addition to tissue called dream. And so that’s why we see everything in molecules we see everything as proteins, and we know our forte is scaffolding the connective tissue. So I think the best thing to do is to tackle that problem and there are a handful of companies in the whole world aiming to solve these issues.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Two questions, A and B, what makes it so complex? Why is it so difficult? And what gives you the confidence that you guys are going to be able to crack this puzzle?

 

Nieves  

Well, it is complex because of the nature of the proteins that comprise the connective tissue and that is collagen. So collagen is a very important structural protein that we have in our body and in an animal’s body.  It’s a beautiful protein but its enormous, it’s huge and that means for scientists, it’s extremely difficult to purify a full length, like the whole thing. So that is why scaffolds are expensive. So now the the scaffolds used in regular medicine are made of animal collagen and it’s a full length, you have the whole thing, because you get it from the rest of you know, bones, animals, etc.  So, we cannot use animal collagen in cellular agriculture, because it defeats the whole purpose of slaughter free products and obtaining slaughter free products or reducing, factory farming. So making collagen and using all the methods from scratch is what makes those scaffolds expensive and why we are sure that we were going to recreate the texture is because we came up with an idea of how to use a mixture of ingredients that make these scaffolds affordable and a way that we can introduce the collagen that is needed in a very efficient and inexpensive way.

 

Andrew D Ive  

So you guys are doing collagen as well as scaffolding.

 

Nieves  

Well, our scaffold contains some collagen. Yes.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Got you. Okay, super. So how has it been going? How have you set yourselves up to do this? You’ve been focused on this now for what? 18 months, two years, something along those lines? How old is the company? 

 

Nieves  

Well, BIV was the first investor and we are going to be one year old in a week. 

 

Andrew D Ive  

Wow, congratulations. 

 

Nieves  

And by one year, what I mean is we incorporated officially in a week because you guys, you know, the money got us into the program. And we were like, okay, now I guess we should incorporate

 

Andrew D Ive  

Someone is giving us money, we should actually go do this thing. So take us through some of the highlights of the last 12 months minus one week.

 

Nieves  

So it was a roller coaster, especially starting the program. There were so many good workshop, classes, advisors, very intensive processing, which for me, as a molecular biology scientist, even though I have some background in venture capital and entrapreneurship classes I took at the university, you guys provided a lot of food industry distribution, manufacturing all the aspects.  So we incorporated. We started and set about finding a lab, which was extremely difficult because of COVID.  It meant that we were able to really produce or confirm our hypothesis mid summer and in July we produced a proof of concept. Right after that, we applied for a patent.  We submitted our provisional patent application at the end of August and then there was Demo Day. Followed by all the fundraising for our pre seed.  In November, we closed our pre seed to focus specifically on the  development of the technology, because we had a number of features that we we are adding to the scaffolds to make it even even better and to achieve the right texture. Because we proved that cells attached to other cells, grew well on our scaffolds and they started differentiating, that means forming muscle fibers. Now we want the density and the texture to be right.  So we are now focusing on that aspect in the first quarter of this year and we are going to open the seed round operations by fall.  The reason for that, is that we have a lot of things in the pipeline that we’re kind of finishing, like integrating the scaffolds into the bio reactors, for instance, one of the projects and, you know, finalizing number of cell lines. So once we have all of that ticked off, they will kick off the hardcore fundraising and show the world what we have in app two.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Okay, and you’ve got a couple of partnerships that you’ve been working on. Are they top secret still? I don’t know if you’ve announced them or not? If they are still top secret, we can leave it ….

 

Nieves  

Well, I can say what type of partnership but the name perhaps not yet. So one of our flagship products, the very first product we want to work on is meat from Iberian pigs. Iberian pigs are very ancient and extraordinary pigs. They are from the Iberian Peninsula which is Spain and Portugal. So these pigs their lineage traces back to ancient times, like the caveman times. Prehistoric, Neolithic even and these pigs bred with wild boars and they have particular genetics which makes them very special.  So, we’re going to start with these Iberian pigs and, because we want the 100% Iberean pigs bred through centuries, we need to go to the source, Spain. Luckily I’m Spanish,  so that makes it much easier to organize. So we have partners there who have farms, and they have a large Iberico production, they’re pretty big in Spain. So yeah, those are our partners and we’re very excited to have them because of everything that entails, you know, the history of the breeds, the quality of the meats. Also, these pigs are special because they are raised in Oak pastures, and they eat acorns, so of course the  diet influences your genetics as well. So these are the most spoiled pigs you could ever think of, and that is what makes their meat extra delicious. 

 

Andrew D Ive  

So the premise here is that it’s not just take a cell, any old cell or a piece of cow or a piece of pig and just grow it. The animal protein industry has spent decades and even centuries creating a lineage of great tasting meat by breeding and crossbreeding different animals. And so you guys have recognized that, and you’ve gone back to the best source of pork, arguably, in the world, and you’ve convinced the best breeders of that pork to work with you on a cell based version of that meat. So you’ve gone and got the best genetics, the best cells as it were, and you’re using them. Now just to be clear, when you harvest those cells, which sounds all very clinical, are these animals slaughtered so that you can capture the cells, or is it one little pig that’s getting a little bit of a biopsy? And it’s then frolicking in the field somewhere? What’s, what’s the route?

 

Nieves  

Well there’s a way to harvest cells that is, you know, you can take an embryo. But of course, that is not the option we chose because, again, that defeats the whole purpose of cellular agriculture. So basically, a biopsy, it’s actually a piercing, like imagine your ear when you want to wear earrings, and you make a piercing ….

 

Andrew D Ive  

A hole in the ear?

 

Nieves  

So basically, this pig is not going to be slaughtered, actually, it is going to stay with us and grow with us and will just wear earrings.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Basically, you’re taking a pig that has the genetics of the best pork breeds in the world. You’ve got one of those pigs, you’re going to have a small biopsy of that pig and use the cells from that pig. Does it have a name this little Piglet, or this little pig? And where will it be living once it’s contributed a few cells to science?

 

Nieves  

Well, his name is Demetrius, his same and we’re going to donate him to a school farm near my hometown, where my nephew can go visit and take care of him. So I’m excited. I’m going to meet him very soon, actually. And it’s going be a very useful.

 

Andrew D Ive  

As far as you’re concerned, given that this is your pig, this pig is going to have a very long happy, fruitful life. It’s not a usual horizon, the next 18 months or whatever is the normal period of time for a pig.

 

Nieves  

Oh, no, he’s gonna grow old. Yes, he’s gonna die of old age for sure. 

 

Andrew D Ive  

Unless he gets out of the pen, in which case he gets run over by a bus or something, but

 

Nieves  

Oh, no, don’t say that. He’s going to be so proud that from a small hole in his ear, is going to feed so many people and he’s still alive. Right? See, this is thanks to you, and he’s gonna be very proud of himself.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Okay, so you’re going to be opening up your fundraising round? Again in August, September. I think you said the fall right. August, September.

 

Nieves  

Yeah. Some time about then.  Well, right now I’m like meeting investors and seeing which ones align with our mission. The kickoff will be once we showcase our pork tenderloin, and then we’re able to show because we like to show rather than just tell. So that’s what is gonna kick off the seed one.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Got it. So you’ve already achieved a number of milestones to date. From the initial funding, you’ve got proof of concept. You’ve got cells being grown. You’ve got some key partnerships in place, with a major distributor, well with major producers and distributors of traditional animal protein, and so on. What do you hope to raise and what do you think that will help you accomplish from a company gross milestone perspective?

 

Nieves  

Yes, definitely. So we’re looking at $4 million seed round. And the reason for that is because I don’t know if I mentioned already, but scaffolding and bio reactors go hand in hand. One thing that we’re doing right now is integrating the scaffolding technology into a bioreactor that needs to be customized for our scratchers. So we’re creating a mini prototype of this bioreactor right now and we want to start with those teams for scaffolding, build a bigger team for scaffolding led by my co founder, Michelle.  Then a team that is going to be focused on kind of scaling up this bioreactor. So those are going to be our main focus for the next year and of course, so that we can make larger amounts of meat, etc, in the second product that we want to do as well. So with  Iberian pork, I have to say, even though our first product is going to be a pork tenderloin plain, you know, well plain, what I mean is like, fresh piece of meat, we also want to try, to save some meat to dry cure and,the reason for that is, because dry cured meats are very cool.  Hams are serious meats and it’s like a whole new experience that meat eaters, once they try it, they love it. So much so, that there is no Iberico, you know, easily readily available at the supermarket, you have to really go to particular stores, that people who visit Spain tried the Iberico, and then they tried to smuggle it into the US and they get caught. And you know, I have a friend whose father bought $1,000 leg of the Iberico and got caught at cost customs. So that would be the gourmet product and then we’ll have the fresh pork as well.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Got it. So Iberico ham, it’s often eaten. at Christmas time in Spain, it’s part of the family tradition, it’s a dry cured product, they have that special leg on the frame that you cut little slices off, and the whole family experiences that kind of cutting and sharing and you guys want to be able to ultimately produce a product that delivers that kind of good quality product. Post the investment. Now you mentioned $4 million from investors in the next round. You mentioned a production capability by reactors, etc. Will that $4 million get you to commercial scale? Or will that still get you to sort of proof of concept to the point where you can show people that, you know, if we put $10 million, or if we put $15 million into this, we’re going to be able to produce pork loin and ham Iberico in large quantities, or is that $4 million going to get you there?

 

Nieves  

Well, building a plant, even a pilot plan already is capital cost intensive. So for a commercial facility, like the one that Memphis meats is building right now, we would need serious money for that. But for a pilot plant, that’s precisely what the 4 million would deliver. So what we want is to generate more scale from lab bench to a pilot scale.

 

Andrew D Ive  

So you’re going to go from lab to pilot scale with that $4 million investment, which is not commercial scale so you won’t be able to produce it in quantities, which can be sold as a kind of revenue generating product. Why take that middle step? Is it necessary? Why not go straight to commercial scale? Or is it very much about aligning funding with with the technology? Obviously, there’s the regulatory piece as well, in terms of being able to sell this product commercially. Can you sell this product commercially today? Or are you still waiting for the government and the regulatory environment to catch up?

 

Nieves  

Well first of all, the pilot plant. As I said before, for commercial scale, you need over 100 million dollars. So as far as I know, there are very few companies that are at this point in fundraising, right now. So basically, they are going to require the regulatory approval way before us. So in that sense, I haven’t, you know, started that process because we’re going to be the second wave of commercial. 

 

Andrew D Ive  

First wave of companies are going to need $100 million to get it to commercial scale. And they’re going to be the folks getting the governments and the regulatory departments on side, you know, federal, the FDA and so on. Getting those folks to approve a permit …..

 

Nieves  

We also will start that process but first we need to create texture. As I said, we started by creating the technology and now we are further developing it to get the right texture. So we are still in the r&d phase, because we are dealing with this new technology we’re creating that is more complex than just growing the cells in a bioreactor it is more a tissue generating technology. So while we create this pilot plant, we need to see how they go into the process on a larger scale and then once we have that, then of course, we can expand.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Okay. In terms of the landscape, are there other companies, as far as you’re aware, tackling the same technology? Either product development? Or, you know, challenges that you guys are tackling? Are there other companies solving related problems? And there’s some form of cooperation?

 

Nieves  

Yes there are two types. So our direct competitors, or people who are also working on scaffolding there nare maybe five serious, funded companies that started earlier than us. The one we really admire is Olive Farms in Israel. So they are scientists from the Technion University team of 20 years or so and they started in 2017, and they released their steak prototype in 2018. Then last year, a little more advanced. So what I’m saying is that is how complex the endeavor is.  Then there’s in the UK, Higher Stakes, they are focused on pork, belly, and bacon. Then in the US, there are two companies, they are going for the b2b approach and they use techniques borrowed from tissue engineering. So in that sense, like nanofiber, technology, electricity technology, and the other one is 3D printing. So I’m not sure how scalable those technologies are, compared to ours. But I would bet, not as scalable mostly because we don’t need to use a 3d printer, or nanofiber technologies.  So we skipped that limiting factor that you need that equipment and those are relying on the speed of the fibers being produced, etc. We don’t have to do that. So I I’m gonna imagine that we were definitely going to be more scalable. Then perhaps a few others are more like, companies are making scaffolds for tissue engineering. They are switching to cell agriculture, but using the same techniques, nano fiber technology and 3d printing ….

 

Andrew D Ive  

So, I was going to ask you, how is the animal protein or the meat, the traditional meat industry responding to what’s going on around them with companies like yours? We’ve already discussed that the partnership that you will be shortly announcing with a very traditional meat company from Spain.  That shows that the traditional meat industry is divided into two parts.  The one part are the meat companies who are recognizing that this technology exists and they should be a part of it one way or another, whether that’s in terms of investing or partnering or you know, working with companies like yours, but I’m guessing there’s also meat companies out there that are putting their head in the sand and pretending that this technology doesn’t exist and won’t last for very long, and are hoping that it just sort of goes away. In terms of communications and conversations you’ve had with meat companies, are most of them moving towards the, you know, let’s talk and let’s figure out how we can be a part of this, or are most of them putting their head in the sand and hoping that this sort of disappears, and the technology just doesn’t work.

 

Nieves  

The ones I’m talking to are the ones who are interested in cellular agriculture, because we were approached by a pretty large number from different countries. They want to know, what are we making, and if we want to collaborate, etc. and I have said no to a couple of those already. There are a number of corporate programs who match startups with big companies, and they were interested in what we’re doing.  Then they want to collaborate in everything. But in our case, we’re early on, so we want to first consolidate and establish our brand and then afterwards, we will consider partnerships but for now, we are staying away from that and, in the case of the Spanish Company it’s not that I convinced them, it was a mutual interest, because the Iberico pigs are in limited number and also imited by the pastures they can be placed in because they anticipate going to a lower number of pigs in the future.  And they do not have many piglets etc. So they know they will have to come up with something and that it’s serious. So it’s mutual interest, because we wanted to sell lines, and they want to be in the future. So they, even though they’re very traditional, very, very traditional they have the vision. So I would say the most advanced meat companies are looking forward, are going to be interested no matter what, if they want to be included. Right. And the other ones that stick their head in the sand, I haven’t talked to anyone yet from that side.

 

Andrew D Ive  

I mean, the reality is the technology works, and you can’t stop it when it works. Like nuclear fusion, you can’t stop it, once people know that it exists. You can try and regulate it, you can try and control it, but you can’t just try to ignore its existence. It’s not the solution.

 

Nieves  

When it has so many benefits for the entire environment, world, health, wellbeing.  So even governments should start looking into subsidizing the plants, etc. If it’s required.  I think the people who are more wary of new technologies, and you know, GMOs or things like that, which has nothing to do with agriculture but what I’m saying is it’s all about education. If you know what something is about, what entails what, how this meat is done, and you see that there is actually nothing wrong with it, then, of course, you’re going to be okay with it.  So I think it’s going to take a lot of education from the companies or nonprofits to educate the consumer in that what we’re giving you is not Frankenstein meat, lab grown, yuk!! It’s actually very simple. If you take a tomato and take a seed out and you plant it then a tomato plant grows. Then the facilities where the meat is going to be made, is going to be very sterile, it’s going to be clean, is not going to be like the slaughterhouses where a lot of diseases can emerge, etc. So there are many benefits, but people don’t know that, and it’s our job to educate them before commercializing is out there.

 

Andrew D Ive  

So, BIV has had a number of conversations with governments, Singapore, China, other places in terms of cellular agriculture and how it can be useful and used to create the protein necessary as population grows. So you’re absolutely right, governments are taking a really strong interest in this technology. The other thing is, I don’t know why the animal protein companies or traditional meat companies, potentially see this as a threat.  But those traditional meat companies understand the consumer, they’ve been working with them, selling products to the consumer for decades, often, they’ve got the channels of distribution, they know how to market the product, how to package the product, how to get the product to the end consumer and they’ve got that inherent knowledge, that’s incredibly useful. There’s nothing to stop them producing the protein in this new way, in addition to or instead of the traditional factory farming or from a farming approach to animal manufacture, and using this technology to be able to manufacture protein, and do what they do best, which is understand their consumer, get the product packaged and ready to go and get it into the different channels of distribution and on the shelves. Those traditional meat companies are just as necessary in the cellular agriculture industry as they would be, and are obviously, in the traditional meat category. So it’s, I don’t see it as an either or I see it as an as well as…..

 

Nieves  

Exactly and I would say that it’s not just about eradicating the whole industry, but maybe just reducing the impact. Starting with that. When you industrialize something and get to the point where it’s super saturated with, more and more production we have to mitigate that with something that is more sustainable. To help the environment and save someone. I don’t think it’s a process that would happen overnight, it’s going to take many years. But we need to start now.

 

Andrew D Ive  

I think consumers are cognizant of this. So there will come a point in time, once this is deregulated, where consumers will make a conscious decision about you know, hey, I can get my meat, the meat that I want the meat that I’ve grown up loving in a way that’s very sustainable, or I can get it in a way that is traditional, but far less sustainable, what am I going to choose? And like it or not, there are going to be consumers who choose cell based over, you know…..

 

Nieves  

Who are those consumers? Young people is clear to everyone that the junk, GNC and the generations coming after them, they already care a lot about sustainability, they look for products that are better for the environment. They know climate change is happening, and they are going to live with  the consequences. Of course, they’re way more conscious.  So I believe that convincing someone who was born in the 50s is a whole different story than convincing someone who already has the mindset of reducing emissions and having cleaner food. So I think they’re going to be so open to well, I think I’m pretty sure they’re gonna be very excited about cellular agriculture in particular, like, you know, those products you know ….steak and you can eat it and it’s delicious.

 

Andrew D Ive  

So I’ve got two questions. Last questions for you. What help do you need to make novel Farm successful? How can people listening to this whoever they are, be helpful to you guys as as you scale Novel Farms?

 

Nieves  

Well, I would say there are two things right now that will be helpful to get from the outside. One is we’re starting the process of hiring and, as I said, we’re going to be focusing on bio reactors. So engineers, we want the best. Come to us knock at the door and also stem cell scientists and business people … so we’re gonna grow the team this year for sure.  And then the other thing is investors of course. Innovation cannot and does not occur without investment. Money drives innovation. We want investors who are mission aligned and not just going for the trend. We want someone who believes in a strong scientific team like us, that can be trusted to make this product right. So resources and money are the two things important to us right now. New team members and new investment.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Alright, so potential employees people who understand bioreactors, stem cell scientists, etc. and resources in terms of funding, partnerships, corporate investment, that sort of thing. Last question, Where do people find out more information about novel farms and about you and your team?

 

Nieves  

So right now we we have Novel Forums on LinkedIn that you can reach out directly to me on LinkedIn and also we have a website. There’s not much there yet because we’re focused on the product development. So yeah, I think the best ways to reach out is through LinkedIn directly to me ….

 

Andrew D Ive  

Now, of course, give us your full name on LinkedIn so that people can find you there and also give us the domain name for your company so that people can go type that in to Mr. Mr. or Miss You

 

Nieves  

Can find us as www.novelfarms.co that’s our website and LinkedIn is the same novel farms…

 

Andrew D Ive  

Spell it out if you wouldn’t mind just so they get it right.  Okay, so novelfarms.co and it’s also novel farms on LinkedIn. So if you want to support or get involved or get recruited by or just you know, give a thumbs up to Nieves Martinez, ni e v e s Martinez, m AR ti n e z. Nieves is on LinkedIn, novel farms is on LinkedIn. Any last words before we say thank you to you very much for your time today. And we head off into the podcasting sunset,

 

Nieves  

as well, that, yeah, we’re very excited to make these products as soon as possible and, and you know, enter the space and give them delicious meats. So that’s all I can say that we are really excited about it and that’s where we are up to so and thank you so much for listening.

 

Andrew D Ive  

Neves thank you so much for your time today.  Thanks for listening to the big idea through podcast. I really appreciate you. Please do subscribe, then you’ll get notifications of the next podcast. If you have any questions or comments, please do reach out. We can also be found by a big idea ventures.com and through Instagram, LinkedIn, all of those wonderful places. So enjoyed the conversation today. I hope you did too. I look forward to hearing from you. Bye.

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